South LA - Building Healthy Communities
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We are

South LA

Building Healthy Communities South Los Angeles (BHC SLA) is a group of diverse partners —including community organizations, health care providers, schools, government agencies, residents, and youth—working together to make South Los Angeles a healthier place to live, work, and play.

The BHC SLA community is home to over 90,000 residents who live in the multiple neighborhoods that make up the South Figueroa Corridor in South LA. Although this diverse community has historically been plagued by public and private disinvestment, its robust non-profit capacity, community mobilizing, and track record of successful advocacy demonstrates a passion to change policies and systems for improved health. BHC SLA seeks to leverage the power that exists in the community through improved collaboration to bring about health equity in South LA.

QUICK FACTS

  • Demographically, the BHC SLA community is about 78.5 percent Hispanic/Latino, 19.0 percent African American or Black, and 2.5 percent other groups.
  • About 50 percent of youth live in poverty and nearly 99 percent of those are youth of color.
  • More than one in three (44 percent) South LA youth were born outside of the United States.
  • About one in three (34 percent) adult residents are uninsured

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LATEST NEWS
  • Temporary rent control restrictions went into effect Thursday in unincorporated parts of Los Angeles County. In these areas, which lie outside of the jurisdiction of the county’s 88 incorporated cities, rent increases for most apartments will be capped at 3 percent annually for the next six months, while county officials consider more permanent regulations.

  • Responding to a Los Angeles Times report that an elite Los Angeles Police Department division oversaw a surge in traffic stops involving African American drivers, Mayor Eric Garcetti said on Monday the Office of the Inspector General will be conducting an audit of the unit.

  • The Los Angeles City Council moved forward Wednesday with a plan to form a task force that would be charged with formulating a citywide youth development strategy.

FOCUS AREAS

Increasing Access to Care: Despite the availability of the Affordable Care Act’s health exchanges or Medi-Cal, many people have not yet enrolled. BHC South Los Angeles is committed to ensuring that all residents have health insurance and access to preventative health care. Partners are also advocating for improved access to care for the undocumented and remaining uninsured and the expansion of school-based wellness centers.

Health Promoting Land Use, Transit and Community Development: The BHC SLA collaborative aims to create vibrant neighborhoods that promote health, wellness, and safety for its residents. BHC SLA partners are engaged in campaigns to advocate for quality and affordable housing, parks and green space, mitigation the impacts of polluting facilities, access to healthy foods, and equitable transit oriented development. The successes include securing more than $30 million for affordable housing and local hiring requirements as part of University of Southern California’s community benefit agreement.

Healthy, Resilient Youth: BHC SLA is working to promote the healthy social and emotional development of youth and the creation of healthy school climates. By developing the advocacy, community organizing, and leadership skills of youth and parents, BHC SLA partners are mobilizing those most impacted to make necessary policy change at the Los Angeles Unified School District and City level. Key successes include amending the Daytime Curfew Ordinance, passing the School Climate Bill of Rights, and the Equity is Justice Resolution.

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